I’ll Just Say It, I Effing Hate Matcha

But more importantly, do people even green juice in the morning anymore? I slurped more of the tart kale smoothie that I had concocted in my blender just earlier this morning, and with each passing chunk of kale that had not been thoroughly blended, it occurred to me how rare it was now to see someone juicing, via Instagram.

I mean, I could go through my stories on any given day and see a constellation of people swearing by matcha tea, lemon water, and other forms of espresso free lives, but I have rarely if ever seen someone drinking the green substance I consume regularly. What happened to the juicing craze that got Karlie Kloss to run three miles from her apartment in NYC with Casey Neistat and down that green liquid like nothing?

I’m so over matcha. Firstly, it isn’t that good. It tastes like dirt. Secondly, it’s not that amazing for you, and despite its reputation as being the “it” drink for a while now, and especially at NYFW, there are a few things you should be well aware of before consuming your new anti-coffee and anti-green juice beverage, to which I am fans of both.

What the ‘f’ is matcha anyway? 

Its literal meaning is “powdered tea.” Typically, with tea, you discard the leaves that get infused into the water, with matcha, you are actually drinking the leaves—which are finely powdered and made into a solution.

Okay, okay, but is it good for you?

So, because matcha is made from high-quality tea, there are more potent sources of nutrients than a traditionally steeped tea. However, the amounts of vitamins and minerals are pretty small. Matcha is rich in antioxidants, specifically, polyphenols, which help curb heart disease and cancer, promote better sugar regulation in the body, blood pressure reduction, and anti-aging. However, despite all of that, trace amounts of nutrients that you do receive from matcha are small.

You still are drinking caffeine.

This one comes from the matcha snobs who tout their devotion to the green drink as a means to step away from caffeine and traditional sources of caffeine like, coffee. There still is caffeine in matcha, in fact, three times as much caffeine in one cup of steeped matcha tea, then one cup of brewed coffee.

But is it bad for you?

No, it’s not bad for you, it just isn’t as amazing as everyone and their mother claims. Most matcha’s are strong, grass-like, spinach-like, and umami tasting, and more often than not, sweetened to improve palatability. A traditional matcha is bitter and much more expensive than high-quality tea. Most matcha’s sold in stores and coffee/tea shops contain added sugar and are most likely a powdered mix. Not true matcha. With matcha, a lower price tag could most likely mean lower quality, so be forewarned. Also, if you’re buying it out at a coffee/tea shop, ask your barista about the quality of the matcha because it usually is some sort of sugary powdered substance, not actual tea.

Lead contamination is a serious concern. 

According to Consumer Lab, even organically grown green teas have been shown to contain lead, which is then absorbed by the plant from the environment, and more particularly rendered from China. When you steep organic tea, 90% of the lead stays in the leaf, with matcha, since the whole leaf is consumed, you will ingest more lead, more quickly. Also, they recommend not drinking more than one cup a day as an adult, and definitely not serving matcha to children.

So now that you know all this information, and you are made aware of you matcha snobby ways, and potential for lead poisoning, I’ll just be over here sipping my kale juice. #noshade #noshade